FREE: DotComSecrets Book
The Underground Playbook For Growing Your Company Online

FREE: DotComSecrets Book
The Underground Playbook For Growing Your Company Online

How To Publish A Book – Definitive 13 Steps Guide (2019)

Start a side hustle by Jan Tumbokon

How To Publish A Book “Writing is easy; all you have to do is open a vein and bleed.” New York Times Sportswriter, Red Smith, not Ernest Hemingway

How do you get on the publishing bandwagon? Let’s assume your manuscript is complete and sitting on your desk or in a folder on your computer. 

Now you need to decide which avenue you want to take for publishing, traditional publisher or self-publisher? That is the million dollar question for any writer that has been in your shoes.

Traditional publishing houses include the big five publishers, Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Hachette, and Macmillan. 

Those five names alone strike fear into the hearts of new authors and published authors. Getting your foot in the door may take more work, but is worthwhile.

Traditional or Trade Publishing

Traditional publishing is home to the big five book publishers in the world. Trade is still the largest category of publishing. These are sold and created for the mass reading market. 

Online publishing is becoming more and more popular, and the big five also offer this to their writers, but traditional publishing still takes on a significant amount of print books for their customers.

Unlike self-publishing, when you choose trade publishing the publishing house will handle all aspects of your book, with little to no cost to you. In traditional publishing, they will offer you a contract, and they will print, market, and sell your book through other retail markets and booksellers. They also buy the rights to your book and they pay you royalties from book sales.

When deciding on a traditional publisher, you will need to have a few things ready before contacting them.

Find an Agent

Most traditional publishers suggest their new authors find a literary agent before trying to publish with them. 

Literary agents act as the middleman between you and the publisher. 

Check with the publisher’s submission guidelines to know how to proceed with trying to publish with them.

Decide what category your book falls under

You will need to decide if your book is fiction or nonfiction and which genre as this can make a difference in whether or not you have a shot at getting published. The publisher you choose may not be looking for that category or genre. 

Keep in mind with trade publishing, some publishing houses only accept certain categories or genres.

Have a book proposal ready

The norm for non-fiction writers is a book proposal with at least three sample chapters. For fiction, most will want the entire finished manuscript with your book proposal.

Compose a query letter

You will need to compose a query letter to send to potential agents and publishing houses. The parts of a query letter are:

A synopsis of your manuscript—what is your manuscript about?

A chapter summary—plot points and events that move it forward.

The target audience you’re aiming for—who you are aiming for.

A description of your skills and yourself.

To write an enticing a proper query letter, be sure to use resources either online or in print. There are many great resources available to help you draw it up.

Full manuscript or sample chapters

Again, this will depend on the category of your manuscript. 

Most non-fiction publishers want the book proposal and sample chapters. 

While fiction publishers want the full manuscript instead. If traditional publishing sounds like too much work or is confusing to you, then self-publishing may be the right choice for you.

Self-Publishing

Self-publishing houses are popping up all the time. There are so many out there, it can make a new author’s head spin. 

Self-publishers exist to make life easier for new authors that would rather have more control over their books. 

There are three main platforms that self-publishers use: print on demand, vanity, and subsidy.

With all self-publishing, authors are expected to pay for services out of their own pockets.

Services include the marketing, sales, promotion, production, distribution, warehousing, printing, and binding of your book making it cheaper for you. 

Before choosing to self publish, be sure to do your research on what method is best for your budget and your book.

Print-on-Demand

POD is by far the most popular method of self-publishing and the easiest. 

With POD, the publishers will accept manuscripts from anyone, new authors, established authors, it doesn’t matter. As long as the author will pay for their services, they will publish your book.

They do not print books in bulk; they are printed on an as-needed basis. Making it the most cost-effective way to get your book published.

A bonus is that they let you market your book your way without their help. All the work to get your book into the hands of the audience is on your shoulders. 

The only thing they do is the publishing for you. 

However, POD companies will offer marketing, editing, and proofreading at an additional cost to you. 

You can also make money off the sales in the form of royalties. This will vary, depending on which self-publisher you publish your book with.

With a POD publisher, some of your book rights will go to the publisher for a certain amount of time, one set by the publisher. This also varies depending on the publisher.

Vanity Publishing

A vanity publisher is a book manufacturer. They will print and bind your book with your money. 

Vanity publishers will take care of marketing, promoting, publishing, editing, and proofreading of your book. 

The catch is that they charge more money for their services, and they want it up front before any work begins. 

Out of the various methods of getting your book published, vanity publishers have the most expensive out-of-pocket cost to you. 

Many authors are happy with their work, even at higher costs because they are known to perform quality work. 

With a vanity publisher, you will own all the rights to your book. They do not pay your royalties. The money from sales will go to you, they do not keep a portion.

If you choose a vanity publisher, you may need to have an Amazon account for your book to be published under. This will depend on the publisher you choose and what their rules for submissions are.

Subsidy Publishing

Subsidy publishing is like vanity in the sense they will handle the printing and binding process for the book. 

However, they keep the rights of the book until they sell it and pay royalties to the author.

The cost to publish your book with a self-publisher can be the best way for you to get your book into the hands of the public, but it is your choice which avenue to take. 

Traditional publishing produces books in larger amounts but takes a lot of work that many authors aren’t willing to do. 

Self-publishing doesn’t take as much work and is much cheaper, depending on what you expect of the chosen publisher.

Gather Feedback on Your Book

Getting feedback on your book is a very important step to having it published either the traditional way or through self-publishing. You don’t want to get feedback too early in the writing process, as it can mess up the vision you have for your story. 

You want your manuscript to be as near to perfect as it can be to prevent rejection. Rejections will happen, but by getting feedback from your peers, other authors, and literary agents your chances will decrease. 

Different ways to get feedback can include fellow writers, avid readers, writing workshops, critique groups, professional editors, or someone that knows the subject you’re writing about. 

All feedback you get will push you forward with your writing career, even if it isn’t what you wanted. Not everyone will feel the same way about your book, but constructive criticism can help you become a better writer. 

Revise Your Book Further

Once you get the feedback you need and note it, you must revise your manuscript again. Based on the feedback you receive you may need to tweak the plot, add to the story, delete some stuff, and maybe put your story in a different order all together. 

After you’ve done some editing from the feedback you’ve received, they will need more editing to find any grammatical or spelling errors. 

You’d want to look professional when the time comes to submit to an agent or publisher.

Prepare Your Manuscript

Each publisher or agent may require your manuscript to be prepared. 

They will have their own requirements, but there are some basic you can follow to help you prepare:

Double space all pages.

One-inch margins—on the left and right-hand sides.

Do not use fancy fonts — the most popular fonts include Times New Roman, Arial, or Courier. 

Number pages—place on the top right-hand side with your last name and title before the number. This can be accomplished by using headers into your pages. 

Add a cover page—this should include your name, email address, telephone number, and physical or mailing address on the left-hand side. 

A cover page will also include the title of your book, centered and capitalized. Underneath it should have your name. For example, “TWISTS AND TURNS” with your name beneath it. Last, the bottom of the page should contain your word count centered. 

Literary Agent or Publisher

This should be your last step or your first step depending on your choice. Either way, prepare for the challenging. 

Finding an agent is just as hard as finding a publisher, for new authors. Many new writers choose to self-publish, but the choice is yours. There are pros and cons for each of them. 

Literary agents will do most of the work for you as far as getting your book published and your idea submitted to the publisher. 

Finding an agent can be difficult and they can be pricey, but agents will communicate with publishing houses for you so you will not have to. 

An agent will screen your work first, decreasing the likelihood of rejection, but not always.  

Working with the publisher will cost less money, but can also be difficult since many require authors to have literary agents. 

Although, not all require an agent, you might still want to consider hiring an agent if your budget will allow it. If not, be sure to read up on the publishing house you’ve chosen for your manuscript, some have very strict guidelines they expect authors to follow. 

Now I’d Like To Hear From You

Chat With Us

That’s how to publish a book…

Marketing Techniques

By now you understand the main differences between traditional publishers and self-publishers. 

You also know what steps you must take before publishing your manuscript, what works and what doesn’t. 

But what about marketing? Marketing might be one of the easiest parts about getting your book published, believe it or not. 

Promotion and marketing of your work is not as complicated as it may seem at first. The following section will help you understand how to market your book to get it published and into the hands of the public. This is assuming you already have an online presence like a blog, social media page, website, or more. 

Even if you’ve chosen to let the publisher or agent promote your book, you can still do self-promotion. A few ways to market your book include: 

Word of Mouth

Post on Social Media 

Blog Posts

Flyers/Newsletters

Offer ARC’s to readers (Advanced Reading Copies)

Email people on your contacts list

Offer discounts 

The information provided is meant help you transition from aspiring author to published author. Much of it may seem like a lot of hard work, but the result is the same, your work will be in the hands of the public and you can see your name in print and reap all the benefits. Good luck!

Do you have anything to add?

SiteGround
SiteGround

How To Publish A Book – Definitive 13 Steps Guide (2019)

Start a side hustle by Jan Tumbokon

How To Publish A Book “Writing is easy; all you have to do is open a vein and bleed.” New York Times Sportswriter, Red Smith, not Ernest Hemingway

How do you get on the publishing bandwagon? Let’s assume your manuscript is complete and sitting on your desk or in a folder on your computer. 

Now you need to decide which avenue you want to take for publishing, traditional publisher or self-publisher? That is the million dollar question for any writer that has been in your shoes.

Traditional publishing houses include the big five publishers, Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Hachette, and Macmillan. 

Those five names alone strike fear into the hearts of new authors and published authors. Getting your foot in the door may take more work, but is worthwhile.

Traditional or Trade Publishing

Traditional publishing is home to the big five book publishers in the world. Trade is still the largest category of publishing. These are sold and created for the mass reading market. 

Online publishing is becoming more and more popular, and the big five also offer this to their writers, but traditional publishing still takes on a significant amount of print books for their customers.

Unlike self-publishing, when you choose trade publishing the publishing house will handle all aspects of your book, with little to no cost to you. In traditional publishing, they will offer you a contract, and they will print, market, and sell your book through other retail markets and booksellers. They also buy the rights to your book and they pay you royalties from book sales.

When deciding on a traditional publisher, you will need to have a few things ready before contacting them.

Find an Agent

Most traditional publishers suggest their new authors find a literary agent before trying to publish with them. 

Literary agents act as the middleman between you and the publisher. 

Check with the publisher’s submission guidelines to know how to proceed with trying to publish with them.

Decide what category your book falls under

You will need to decide if your book is fiction or nonfiction and which genre as this can make a difference in whether or not you have a shot at getting published. The publisher you choose may not be looking for that category or genre. 

Keep in mind with trade publishing, some publishing houses only accept certain categories or genres.

Have a book proposal ready

The norm for non-fiction writers is a book proposal with at least three sample chapters. For fiction, most will want the entire finished manuscript with your book proposal.

Compose a query letter

You will need to compose a query letter to send to potential agents and publishing houses. The parts of a query letter are:

A synopsis of your manuscript—what is your manuscript about?

A chapter summary—plot points and events that move it forward.

The target audience you’re aiming for—who you are aiming for.

A description of your skills and yourself.

To write an enticing a proper query letter, be sure to use resources either online or in print. There are many great resources available to help you draw it up.

Full manuscript or sample chapters

Again, this will depend on the category of your manuscript. 

Most non-fiction publishers want the book proposal and sample chapters. 

While fiction publishers want the full manuscript instead. If traditional publishing sounds like too much work or is confusing to you, then self-publishing may be the right choice for you.

Self-Publishing

Self-publishing houses are popping up all the time. There are so many out there, it can make a new author’s head spin. 

Self-publishers exist to make life easier for new authors that would rather have more control over their books. 

There are three main platforms that self-publishers use: print on demand, vanity, and subsidy.

With all self-publishing, authors are expected to pay for services out of their own pockets.

Services include the marketing, sales, promotion, production, distribution, warehousing, printing, and binding of your book making it cheaper for you. 

Before choosing to self publish, be sure to do your research on what method is best for your budget and your book.

Print-on-Demand

POD is by far the most popular method of self-publishing and the easiest. 

With POD, the publishers will accept manuscripts from anyone, new authors, established authors, it doesn’t matter. As long as the author will pay for their services, they will publish your book.

They do not print books in bulk; they are printed on an as-needed basis. Making it the most cost-effective way to get your book published.

A bonus is that they let you market your book your way without their help. All the work to get your book into the hands of the audience is on your shoulders. 

The only thing they do is the publishing for you. 

However, POD companies will offer marketing, editing, and proofreading at an additional cost to you. 

You can also make money off the sales in the form of royalties. This will vary, depending on which self-publisher you publish your book with.

With a POD publisher, some of your book rights will go to the publisher for a certain amount of time, one set by the publisher. This also varies depending on the publisher.

Vanity Publishing

A vanity publisher is a book manufacturer. They will print and bind your book with your money. 

Vanity publishers will take care of marketing, promoting, publishing, editing, and proofreading of your book. 

The catch is that they charge more money for their services, and they want it up front before any work begins. 

Out of the various methods of getting your book published, vanity publishers have the most expensive out-of-pocket cost to you. 

Many authors are happy with their work, even at higher costs because they are known to perform quality work. 

With a vanity publisher, you will own all the rights to your book. They do not pay your royalties. The money from sales will go to you, they do not keep a portion.

If you choose a vanity publisher, you may need to have an Amazon account for your book to be published under. This will depend on the publisher you choose and what their rules for submissions are.

Subsidy Publishing

Subsidy publishing is like vanity in the sense they will handle the printing and binding process for the book. 

However, they keep the rights of the book until they sell it and pay royalties to the author.

The cost to publish your book with a self-publisher can be the best way for you to get your book into the hands of the public, but it is your choice which avenue to take. 

Traditional publishing produces books in larger amounts but takes a lot of work that many authors aren’t willing to do. 

Self-publishing doesn’t take as much work and is much cheaper, depending on what you expect of the chosen publisher.

Gather Feedback on Your Book

Getting feedback on your book is a very important step to having it published either the traditional way or through self-publishing. You don’t want to get feedback too early in the writing process, as it can mess up the vision you have for your story. 

You want your manuscript to be as near to perfect as it can be to prevent rejection. Rejections will happen, but by getting feedback from your peers, other authors, and literary agents your chances will decrease. 

Different ways to get feedback can include fellow writers, avid readers, writing workshops, critique groups, professional editors, or someone that knows the subject you’re writing about. 

All feedback you get will push you forward with your writing career, even if it isn’t what you wanted. Not everyone will feel the same way about your book, but constructive criticism can help you become a better writer. 

Revise Your Book Further

Once you get the feedback you need and note it, you must revise your manuscript again. Based on the feedback you receive you may need to tweak the plot, add to the story, delete some stuff, and maybe put your story in a different order all together. 

After you’ve done some editing from the feedback you’ve received, they will need more editing to find any grammatical or spelling errors. 

You’d want to look professional when the time comes to submit to an agent or publisher.

Prepare Your Manuscript

Each publisher or agent may require your manuscript to be prepared. 

They will have their own requirements, but there are some basic you can follow to help you prepare:

Double space all pages.

One-inch margins—on the left and right-hand sides.

Do not use fancy fonts — the most popular fonts include Times New Roman, Arial, or Courier. 

Number pages—place on the top right-hand side with your last name and title before the number. This can be accomplished by using headers into your pages. 

Add a cover page—this should include your name, email address, telephone number, and physical or mailing address on the left-hand side. 

A cover page will also include the title of your book, centered and capitalized. Underneath it should have your name. For example, “TWISTS AND TURNS” with your name beneath it. Last, the bottom of the page should contain your word count centered. 

Literary Agent or Publisher

This should be your last step or your first step depending on your choice. Either way, prepare for the challenging. 

Finding an agent is just as hard as finding a publisher, for new authors. Many new writers choose to self-publish, but the choice is yours. There are pros and cons for each of them. 

Literary agents will do most of the work for you as far as getting your book published and your idea submitted to the publisher. 

Finding an agent can be difficult and they can be pricey, but agents will communicate with publishing houses for you so you will not have to. 

An agent will screen your work first, decreasing the likelihood of rejection, but not always.  

Working with the publisher will cost less money, but can also be difficult since many require authors to have literary agents. 

Although, not all require an agent, you might still want to consider hiring an agent if your budget will allow it. If not, be sure to read up on the publishing house you’ve chosen for your manuscript, some have very strict guidelines they expect authors to follow. 

Now I’d Like To Hear From You

Chat With Us

That’s how to publish a book…

Marketing Techniques

By now you understand the main differences between traditional publishers and self-publishers. 

You also know what steps you must take before publishing your manuscript, what works and what doesn’t. 

But what about marketing? Marketing might be one of the easiest parts about getting your book published, believe it or not. 

Promotion and marketing of your work is not as complicated as it may seem at first. The following section will help you understand how to market your book to get it published and into the hands of the public. This is assuming you already have an online presence like a blog, social media page, website, or more. 

Even if you’ve chosen to let the publisher or agent promote your book, you can still do self-promotion. A few ways to market your book include: 

Word of Mouth

Post on Social Media 

Blog Posts

Flyers/Newsletters

Offer ARC’s to readers (Advanced Reading Copies)

Email people on your contacts list

Offer discounts 

The information provided is meant help you transition from aspiring author to published author. Much of it may seem like a lot of hard work, but the result is the same, your work will be in the hands of the public and you can see your name in print and reap all the benefits. Good luck!

Do you have anything to add?

SiteGround
SiteGround

FREE: DotComSecrets Book
The Underground Playbook For Growing Your Company Online

How To Publish A Book – Definitive 13 Steps Guide (2019)

Start a side hustle by Jan Tumbokon

How To Publish A Book “Writing is easy; all you have to do is open a vein and bleed.” New York Times Sportswriter, Red Smith, not Ernest Hemingway

How do you get on the publishing bandwagon? Let’s assume your manuscript is complete and sitting on your desk or in a folder on your computer. 

Now you need to decide which avenue you want to take for publishing, traditional publisher or self-publisher? That is the million dollar question for any writer that has been in your shoes.

Traditional publishing houses include the big five publishers, Penguin Random House, HarperCollins, Simon & Schuster, Hachette, and Macmillan. 

Those five names alone strike fear into the hearts of new authors and published authors. Getting your foot in the door may take more work, but is worthwhile.

Traditional or Trade Publishing

Traditional publishing is home to the big five book publishers in the world. Trade is still the largest category of publishing. These are sold and created for the mass reading market. 

Online publishing is becoming more and more popular, and the big five also offer this to their writers, but traditional publishing still takes on a significant amount of print books for their customers.

Unlike self-publishing, when you choose trade publishing the publishing house will handle all aspects of your book, with little to no cost to you. In traditional publishing, they will offer you a contract, and they will print, market, and sell your book through other retail markets and booksellers. They also buy the rights to your book and they pay you royalties from book sales.

When deciding on a traditional publisher, you will need to have a few things ready before contacting them.

Find an Agent

Most traditional publishers suggest their new authors find a literary agent before trying to publish with them. 

Literary agents act as the middleman between you and the publisher. 

Check with the publisher’s submission guidelines to know how to proceed with trying to publish with them.

Decide what category your book falls under

You will need to decide if your book is fiction or nonfiction and which genre as this can make a difference in whether or not you have a shot at getting published. The publisher you choose may not be looking for that category or genre. 

Keep in mind with trade publishing, some publishing houses only accept certain categories or genres.

Have a book proposal ready

The norm for non-fiction writers is a book proposal with at least three sample chapters. For fiction, most will want the entire finished manuscript with your book proposal.

Compose a query letter

You will need to compose a query letter to send to potential agents and publishing houses. The parts of a query letter are:

A synopsis of your manuscript—what is your manuscript about?

A chapter summary—plot points and events that move it forward.

The target audience you’re aiming for—who you are aiming for.

A description of your skills and yourself.

To write an enticing a proper query letter, be sure to use resources either online or in print. There are many great resources available to help you draw it up.

Full manuscript or sample chapters

Again, this will depend on the category of your manuscript. 

Most non-fiction publishers want the book proposal and sample chapters. 

While fiction publishers want the full manuscript instead. If traditional publishing sounds like too much work or is confusing to you, then self-publishing may be the right choice for you.

Self-Publishing

Self-publishing houses are popping up all the time. There are so many out there, it can make a new author’s head spin. 

Self-publishers exist to make life easier for new authors that would rather have more control over their books. 

There are three main platforms that self-publishers use: print on demand, vanity, and subsidy.

With all self-publishing, authors are expected to pay for services out of their own pockets.

Services include the marketing, sales, promotion, production, distribution, warehousing, printing, and binding of your book making it cheaper for you. 

Before choosing to self publish, be sure to do your research on what method is best for your budget and your book.

Print-on-Demand

POD is by far the most popular method of self-publishing and the easiest. 

With POD, the publishers will accept manuscripts from anyone, new authors, established authors, it doesn’t matter. As long as the author will pay for their services, they will publish your book.

They do not print books in bulk; they are printed on an as-needed basis. Making it the most cost-effective way to get your book published.

A bonus is that they let you market your book your way without their help. All the work to get your book into the hands of the audience is on your shoulders. 

The only thing they do is the publishing for you. 

However, POD companies will offer marketing, editing, and proofreading at an additional cost to you. 

You can also make money off the sales in the form of royalties. This will vary, depending on which self-publisher you publish your book with.

With a POD publisher, some of your book rights will go to the publisher for a certain amount of time, one set by the publisher. This also varies depending on the publisher.

Vanity Publishing

A vanity publisher is a book manufacturer. They will print and bind your book with your money. 

Vanity publishers will take care of marketing, promoting, publishing, editing, and proofreading of your book. 

The catch is that they charge more money for their services, and they want it up front before any work begins. 

Out of the various methods of getting your book published, vanity publishers have the most expensive out-of-pocket cost to you. 

Many authors are happy with their work, even at higher costs because they are known to perform quality work. 

With a vanity publisher, you will own all the rights to your book. They do not pay your royalties. The money from sales will go to you, they do not keep a portion.

If you choose a vanity publisher, you may need to have an Amazon account for your book to be published under. This will depend on the publisher you choose and what their rules for submissions are.

Subsidy Publishing

Subsidy publishing is like vanity in the sense they will handle the printing and binding process for the book. 

However, they keep the rights of the book until they sell it and pay royalties to the author.

The cost to publish your book with a self-publisher can be the best way for you to get your book into the hands of the public, but it is your choice which avenue to take. 

Traditional publishing produces books in larger amounts but takes a lot of work that many authors aren’t willing to do. 

Self-publishing doesn’t take as much work and is much cheaper, depending on what you expect of the chosen publisher.

Gather Feedback on Your Book

Getting feedback on your book is a very important step to having it published either the traditional way or through self-publishing. You don’t want to get feedback too early in the writing process, as it can mess up the vision you have for your story. 

You want your manuscript to be as near to perfect as it can be to prevent rejection. Rejections will happen, but by getting feedback from your peers, other authors, and literary agents your chances will decrease. 

Different ways to get feedback can include fellow writers, avid readers, writing workshops, critique groups, professional editors, or someone that knows the subject you’re writing about. 

All feedback you get will push you forward with your writing career, even if it isn’t what you wanted. Not everyone will feel the same way about your book, but constructive criticism can help you become a better writer. 

Revise Your Book Further

Once you get the feedback you need and note it, you must revise your manuscript again. Based on the feedback you receive you may need to tweak the plot, add to the story, delete some stuff, and maybe put your story in a different order all together. 

After you’ve done some editing from the feedback you’ve received, they will need more editing to find any grammatical or spelling errors. 

You’d want to look professional when the time comes to submit to an agent or publisher.

Prepare Your Manuscript

Each publisher or agent may require your manuscript to be prepared. 

They will have their own requirements, but there are some basic you can follow to help you prepare:

Double space all pages.

One-inch margins—on the left and right-hand sides.

Do not use fancy fonts — the most popular fonts include Times New Roman, Arial, or Courier. 

Number pages—place on the top right-hand side with your last name and title before the number. This can be accomplished by using headers into your pages. 

Add a cover page—this should include your name, email address, telephone number, and physical or mailing address on the left-hand side. 

A cover page will also include the title of your book, centered and capitalized. Underneath it should have your name. For example, “TWISTS AND TURNS” with your name beneath it. Last, the bottom of the page should contain your word count centered. 

Literary Agent or Publisher

This should be your last step or your first step depending on your choice. Either way, prepare for the challenging. 

Finding an agent is just as hard as finding a publisher, for new authors. Many new writers choose to self-publish, but the choice is yours. There are pros and cons for each of them. 

Literary agents will do most of the work for you as far as getting your book published and your idea submitted to the publisher. 

Finding an agent can be difficult and they can be pricey, but agents will communicate with publishing houses for you so you will not have to. 

An agent will screen your work first, decreasing the likelihood of rejection, but not always.  

Working with the publisher will cost less money, but can also be difficult since many require authors to have literary agents. 

Although, not all require an agent, you might still want to consider hiring an agent if your budget will allow it. If not, be sure to read up on the publishing house you’ve chosen for your manuscript, some have very strict guidelines they expect authors to follow. 

Now I’d Like To Hear From You

Chat With Us

That’s how to publish a book…

Marketing Techniques

By now you understand the main differences between traditional publishers and self-publishers. 

You also know what steps you must take before publishing your manuscript, what works and what doesn’t. 

But what about marketing? Marketing might be one of the easiest parts about getting your book published, believe it or not. 

Promotion and marketing of your work is not as complicated as it may seem at first. The following section will help you understand how to market your book to get it published and into the hands of the public. This is assuming you already have an online presence like a blog, social media page, website, or more. 

Even if you’ve chosen to let the publisher or agent promote your book, you can still do self-promotion. A few ways to market your book include: 

Word of Mouth

Post on Social Media 

Blog Posts

Flyers/Newsletters

Offer ARC’s to readers (Advanced Reading Copies)

Email people on your contacts list

Offer discounts 

The information provided is meant help you transition from aspiring author to published author. Much of it may seem like a lot of hard work, but the result is the same, your work will be in the hands of the public and you can see your name in print and reap all the benefits. Good luck!

Do you have anything to add?